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"Moritz Gnann, brought additional moments of lyricism and drama to the Koussevitzky Shed."

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[...] Gnann is completing his third season as BSO assistant conductor, and in his time with the orchestra he has prepared scores with Andris Nelsons. Like his Latvian boss, Gnann leads with a keen eye to musical detail. His reading of Schumann’s Symphony No. 3, Rhenish, heard Friday night, revealed a firm, multi-dimensional sense of orchestration.

Gnann approached the outer of the symphony’s five movements with sweeping energy, though he lingered on the songlike themes of these movements. The second movement’s ländler flowed like the water of the eponymous river of the symphony’s subtitle.

Leading with sweeping gestures and crouches, Gnann coaxed soft, reverential lines from the ensemble in the third movement. Wind melodies dissolved into soft sonorities, and solo cello wove a burnished melody through the texture. The fourth movement, long thought to be Schumann’s depiction of a processional in the Cologne Cathedral, was as somber and solemn as an ancient ceremony, to which the organ-like brass brought grand solemnity.


Aaron Keebaugh, The Classical Review

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"A night to remember, for his own performance and that of his piano soloist, 92-year-old Beaux Arts Trio founder Menahem Pressler. 

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After intermission, Gnann, not to be outdone, offered a distinctive reading of the Dvorák. (...)


Gnann let it all unfurl without pushing too hard. The first movement (whose exposition repeat he omitted) was full of contrasts, with a tender second theme and dramatic climaxes. The conclusion was ferocious, but all the more transparent for not being whipped into a frenzy. (...)


Throughout the performance, Gnann made you stop, think, and reconsider. No small achievement in such a familiar symphony."

Boston Globe

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"AT TANGLEWOOD: A YOUNG CONDUCTOR'S MARVELOUS MAHLER"

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"Performances earlier in the weekend were executed with precision, but were not memorable. That changed Sunday afternoon when Moritz Gnann, the orchestra’s assistant conductor, took the podium."


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[...] Gnann had complete control over the shape and color of the opening movement, the softness of the A helping to evoke the quiet of the forest which Mahler augmented with bird calls, offstage trumpet fanfares, and horn melodies. (...)


As the work progressed, Gnann’s attention to detail became apparent. He masterfully weaved the threads of Mahler’s music, allowing parts rarely heard clearly, such as those from the harp and bass drum, albeit played softly, to contribute to the sonority."

Concert Review by Seth Arenstein

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"Gnann was able to express the complexity of the score, which is suited to the complexity of the composition in every way, with tremendous tension, made Britten's skillful instrumentation with a transparent overall sound, from the bird song in Billy's cradle to the last, when the loop of the string is drawn. But the dramatically more elaborate passages also took their place in a performance that really deeply aroused." (translated from German)
Oper-Aktuell

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Oresteia - XENAKIS


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"The Deutsche Oper Berlin masters Xenakis' Oresteia thanks to Moritz Gnann (...)"

Opernwelt

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VIDEOS


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PHOTOS



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Moritz Gnann
Moritz Gnann
Moritz Gnann

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Credits


Photos of Moritz Gnann with the BSO, by Hilary Scott

Portraits by Simon Pauly


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